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Fountaindale Special School - Nottinghamsire Local Authority School

Fountaindale is a Specialist SEN school situated in Mansfield, Nottinghamshire that offers an inclusive education for pupils aged 3 to 19, who have complex physical and sensory needs. We ensure that each and every child has the opportunity to achieve their full potential.

Who to contact

Telephone
01623 792671
Fax: 01623 797849
E-mail
office@fountaindale.notts.sch.uk
Website
www.fountaindale.notts.sch.uk

Where to go

Address
Nottingham Road
Mansfield
Nottinghamshire
Postcode
NG18 5BA

Other Details

Local Offer Localoffer flash icon

Description

Fountaindale is a Specialist SEN school situated in Mansfield, Nottinghamshire that offers an inclusive education for pupils aged 3 to 19, who have complex physical and sensory needs. We ensure that each and every child has the opportunity to achieve their full potential.

Local Offer Age Bands
Secondary (11-16 years)
Primary (4-10 years)
Early Years (0-4 years)

Schools Extended Local Offer Response

1. What kinds of special educational needs does the school/setting make provision for?
  • Fountaindale is a Specialist SEN school which offers inclusive education for up to 75 pupils aged 3 to 19, who have complex physical, medical and sensory needs.
  • The school provides specialist educational facilities on a day basis and also has residential provision which can be accessed by older students on a part time basis.
  • Due to its specialist nature, the school’s catchment area includes the whole of Nottinghamshire Local Authority. Students are also accepted from surrounding Local Authorities, including Nottinghamshire City, Derbyshire and Derby City, subject to agreement by those authorities with Nottinghamshire LA.
  • All pupils attending Fountaindale will have either a Statement of Special Educational Need or an Education, Health, and Care Plan (which will soon replace statements of SEN)
  • In addition to the school based provision, Fountaindale is commissioned to provide services to support mainstream schools and children. This includes the Physical Disability Specialist Service (PDSS) which supports the inclusion of children with physical disabilities into mainstream schools and the Health Related Education Team, who provide short term education for mainstream pupils unable to attend their usual school for health related reasons.
2. (For mainstream schools & maintained nurseries only) How does the school/setting know if pupils need extra help and what should I do if I think that my child may have special educational needs?

Not applicable to special schools.

3.a) How does the school/setting evaluate the effectiveness of its provision for pupils with special educational needs?
  • All pupils at Fountaindale have significant special needs and therefore the school has in place a robust programme for reviewing the quality of teaching and learning that it offers. This includes:

i. Detailed target setting and tracking of pupil progress at an individual pupil level

ii. Termly monitoring of pupil progress with individual teachers through the appraisal process

iii. Annual, whole school analysis of progress data against national           standards

iv. Regular lesson observations by members of the Senior Leadership Team (with judgments validated by a member of the   Local Authority’s Education Improvement service)

v. Work scrutiny carried out by members of the school’s Leadership Team

vi. ½ termly monitoring visits by the governing body

vii. ½ termly Learning Walks carried out by members of the Leadership Team and the Governing Body

Annual Achievement Review carried out by theLA’s Education Improvement Adviser in conjunction with members of the governing body and school Leadership Team

3.b) How will both the school/setting and I know how my child/young person is doing and how will the school/setting help me to support their learning?
  • Parents have the opportunity to meet teaching staff individually at least 3 times a year to discuss their child’s progress set against their individual learning objectives and targets
  • Termly Curriculum Programmes are sent out to all parents which outline the areas of study their child will be undertaking that term.
  • An annual written Curriculum Report is sent to parents which reviews their child’s progress in all areas across the year against the targets they were set.
  • Termly IEP’s are sent to parents which highlight key cross-curricular objectives for their child related to their personal and social development
  • Child centred reviews of a child’s Statement of Special Educational Needs or their Education, Health and Care Plan take place at least once a year. These meetings are held with the child, their parents and the professionals from Education, Health and Social Care, who work together to meet the child’s needs.
  • Regular coffee mornings are held for parents and will often include a focus for discussion concerning supporting their child’s learning
  • Specific workshops and training courses are held regularly to support parents in working with their child.
3.c) What is the school's approach to teaching pupils with special educational needs?
  • Pupils are grouped broadly into 3 curriculum strands and by their age.
  • The ‘Pre-Formal’ curriculum is for children with profound and complex needs who need a very special approach to their learning. This group of pupils will work with familiar adults who will help them develop through using multi-sensory approaches.
  • The‘Semi-Formal’ curriculum is for pupils who learn best when learning is related to their own experiences. Some pupils may learn through structured play whilst others will learn more effectively through functional activities or through topic-based approaches.
  • The ‘Formal’ curriculum is for pupils who are working at National Curriculum levels at the end of Key Stage 2. This group of pupils are largely taught through individual subjects such as Maths, English and Science. Some pupils will still access specialist provision as part of their personalised provision.
  • Some pupils may require a mixture of curriculum approaches. Flexibility is built into the system to allow pupils to change groups if a different approach best supports their learning need within a particular curriculum area
3.d) How will the curriculum and learning be matched to my child/young person's needs?
  • All the classes at Fountaindale are small and have a high staff to pupil ratio.
  • The pupils have the opportunity to work as a whole class, small group and individually.
  • All pupils have their own learning plan or pathway which highlights what objectives or targets they need to work on next in each area of the curriculum, the activities planned and a lesson by lesson evaluation of how they are progressing.
  • Planning for each child is therefore ‘dynamic’ and is constantly updated as a result of ongoing assessment of their progress 
3.e) How are decisions made about the type and amount of support my child/young person will receive?
  • On entry to the school, children are initially assessed for how the school will meet their educational, medical and personal needs as described in their Statement of Special Educational Need or their Education, Health and Care Plan. These assessments may involve teachers, physiotherapists, Occupational Therapists, Speech & Language Therapists, school nurses and other specialist school staff.
  • Following these assessments, integrated plans for each area of support required are put together and shared and discussed with parents.
  • These plans are formally reviewed after 6-8 weeks after entry and then regularly, depending on level of need. Statements of Special Educational Needs or Education, Health and Care Plans are formally reviewed at least annually.
3.f) How will my child/young person be included in activities outside the classroom, including school trips?
  • The school views access to activities outside the classroom or normal school day as highly beneficial to a child’s learning, and, as such, would encourage all parents to allow their child access to the many opportunities that the school provides
  • All pupils have access to after school clubs, holiday clubs, extended school visits and opportunities to attend residential visits.
  • The school has its own mini-bus to enable these visits to happen. Staff are fully trained to support pupil’s medical needs while off-site and a thorough risk assessment process is always undertaken.
  • Pupils in Key Stage 4 and Post 16 may also be able to access the school’s own residential facilities for one night per week in termly blocks to further develop their independence living skills.
3.g) What support will there be for my child/young person's overall well-being?
  • Many of our children at Fountaindale have a range of personal and medical needs in addition to learning needs. Plans for these are drawn up in consultation with parents, the child and professionals involved. Such plans are integrated within the school day in order to support rather than detract from the child’s opportunities for learning.
  • The school encourages a respectful relationship between staff and pupils so that pupils feel comfortable to express their feelings or concerns with staff of their choosing
  • The school has a policy for staff on respecting the rights of pupils to courtesy, dignity and privacy.
  • Each class has its own team of staff who get to know the needs of each child in the group very well and build up close, yet professional relationships
  • The school has a thriving School Council which gives pupils the opportunities to give their views and ideas regarding the organisation of the school
  • All pupils have access to a programme of Personal, Social and Health Education which is adapted to ensure it meets individual pupil need.
  • Reviews of each child’s Statement of Special Educational Needs or Education, Health and Care Plan are ‘child centred’ and fully involve the child in giving their views and opinions regarding the meeting of their present and future needs
4. (For mainstream schools and maintained nurseries) Who is the school/setting's special educational needs co-ordinator (SENCO) and what are their contact details.

Not applicable to special schools.

5. a) What training have staff supporting special educational needs had and what is planned?
  • All staff receive training on an annual basis to support pupil’s health and safety needs as well as more specialists training around specific conditions.
  • We have our own trainers for Safeguarding, Safe Moving and Handling and Managing Actual and Potential Aggression.
  • Through Inset days and  Continuing Professional Development (CPD), all staff take part in specialist training related to the curriculum strands that we operate and the specific needs of our children.
  • Staff are kept up to date with new development and Continuing Professional Development (CPD) is an integrated part of all staff appraisals.
  • Several of the teaching staff have higher qualifications in Special Educational Needs
  • We have a qualified teacher for  Visual Impairment
  • We commission professionally qualified specialists as required to provide specific aspects of our curriculum (eg. Music Therapists, Art Therapists, Disability Sports Coaches)
5.b) What specialist services and expertise are available or accessed by the setting/school?
  • A multi-professional approach is the key to effectively supporting the pupil’s needs as a whole at Fountaindale.
  • We have on-site Physiotherapists, School Nurses, Speech and Language Therapists, and Occupational Therapists
  • Pediatricians and dieticians  hold regular clinics at the school
  • The school has access to a range of other local service providers as required including Visual Impairment and Hearing Impairment advisers, educational Psychologists, Child and Adolescence Mental Health Service (CAMHS), Social Care Children’s Disability Team participation workers, social workers and transition workers, Education Improvement advisers
6. How will equipment and facilities to support pupils with special educational needs secured? How accessible is the school/setting?
  • Fountaindale has recently moved into a new purpose built single storey school building
  • The building has been specifically designed to meet the needs of pupils with complex physical, medical and sensory needs. As such all areas inside and outside the building are fully accessible.
  • The school has a range of specialist equipment and specialist areas including 3 interactive sensory areas, a sensory based hydrotherapy pool, fully adapted Food Technology, Design Technology classrooms, Science Lab, and medical/therapy treatment areas.
  • All classrooms are equipped with interactive boards and tracking hoists
  • Each classroom has its own fully adapted hygiene suite and specialist equipment store.
  • A large proportion of the school’s annual budget is set aside for the provision of specialist equipment to support the learning and health needs of pupils. In addition the school has a very active fundraising programme, which is well supported by our community partners. The school also has a member of staff with designated responsibility for bidding for additional funding from national grants or charitable organisations
7. What are the arrangements for consulting parents of pupils with special educational needs? How will be I involved in the education of my child/young person?
  • Parents are vital in the education of their child and the school regularly involves them in this process.
  • On entry, pre and post-admission meetings are held with parents to ensure that parents are satisfied that their child’s needs are being met effectively and safely by the school
  • Parents have the opportunity to meet with school staff at least 3 times per year in parents’ evenings/mornings/afternoons to discuss their child’s progress set against their individual learning objectives and targets
  • Termly Curriculum Programmes are sent out to all parents which outline the areas of study their child will be undertaking that term.
  • An annual written Curriculum Report is sent to parents which reviews their child’s progress in all areas across the year against the targets they were set.
  • Termly IEP’s are sent to parents which highlight key cross-curricular objectives for their child related t their personal and social development
  • Child centred reviews of a child’s Statement of Special Educational Needs or their Education, Health and Care Plan take place at least once a year. These meetings are held with the child, their parents and the professionals from Education, Health and Social Care, who work together to meet the child’s needs.
  • Regular coffee mornings are held for parents and will often include a focus for discussion concerning supporting their child’s learning
  • Specific workshops and training courses are held regularly to support parents in working with their child.
  • There are also more informal opportunities for parents to be informed and consulted about their child’s learning at school like open afternoons, daily diaries, regular letters, termly whole school newsletters
  • The school has a dedicated Family Liaison worker who can be the first point of contact for the parent if they have any particular concerns or queries about school provision for their child.
8. What are the arrangements for consulting young people with SEN and involving them in their education?
  • Fountaindale covers a wide range of ages and abilities and consulting with pupils is based on these factors.
  • Pupils formally input into their annual review and their views are sought through a pupil centred approach to these reviews.
  • All pupils have a tutor or class teacher along with a team of support staff. A specific aspect of the school’s ethos is that the views and wishes of pupils are listened to and responded to.
  • The school has a strong school council which regularly meets and reports back to the Principal regarding pupil views about the organisation and function of the school.
  • Pupils can be provided with an independent advocate through the National Youth Advocacy Service.
9. What do I do if I have a concern or complaint about the SEN provision made by the school/setting?
  • The school promotes an open relationship with parents
  • If a parent has any concern then we would encourage them to contact school immediately in the first instance.
  • The school has a dedicated Family Liaison worker who can be the first point of contact for parents. They will investigate your concern and respond to you on the same day.
  • The majority of issues are successfully resolved in this way. However, if you are still unsatisfied, the school has a formal complaints procedure, which you can access from the school’s website or directly from the school. 
10. How does the governing body involve other organisations and services (e.g. health, social care, local authority support services and voluntary organisations) in meeting the needs of pupils with special educational needs and supporting the families of such pupils?
  • We have on-site Physiotherapists, School Nurses, Speech and Language Therapists, and Occupational Therapists
  • Pediatricians and dieticians  hold regular clinics at the school
  • The school has access to a range of other local service providers as required including Visual Impairment and Hearing Impairment advisers, educational Psychologists, Child and Adolescence Mental Health Service (CAMHS), Social Care Children’s Disability Team participation workers, social workers and transition workers, Education Improvement advisers
  • Child centred reviews of a child’s Statement of Special Educational Needs or their Education, Health and Care Plan take place at least once a year. These meetings are held with the child, their parents and the professionals from Education, Health and Social Care, who work together to meet the child’s needs.
  • The governing body regularly monitors all aspects of school life through its working committees and regular full governing body meetings.
11. How does the school/setting seek to signpost organisations, services etc who can provide additional support to parents/carers/young people?

  

  • Signposting parents to information is usually undertaken on an individual basis at review meetings or from individually arranged meetings.
  • The school holds information on a range of services available to parents such as targeted support, short break services etc. However, if necessary, multi-agency meetings can be arranged with parents to discuss specific issues.
  • The school also hold parent workshops and parent coffee mornings to share relevant information.
  • The Nottinghamshire County Council Local Offer web site is also extremely useful. www.nottinghamshire.sendlocaloffer.org.uk
12. How will the school/setting prepare my child/young person to: i) Join the school/setting?
  • Pre-admission meetings are held with parents to plan how the school will meet the various needs of each individual child. This may reqquire specific assessments to be completed prior to the child starting at the school. Parents are fully involved and consulted in this process
  • Individual transition programmes are prepared and agreed with parents which may involve pre- visits, spending time in class and phased entry, if needed.
  • Post admission meetings are held with parents approximately 6 weeks after admission to ensure that parents are satisfied with the school’s arrangements for meeting the needs of their child and to agree initial objectives and targets for their child’s progress.
ii) Transfer between phases of education (e.g. early years to primary, primary to secondary etc)?
  • The school does not have stringent  transfer points between the Early Years, Primary, Secondary and Post 16 phases. This is to allow a child’s transition through the school to be determined by their specific needs rather than the fact that they have reached a certain age.
  • A child’s class group is kept under regular review and transition to another group or phase is always planned and agreed with parents
  • Teachers and support staff spend time with previous class teams to ensure a smooth handover.
iii) Prepare for adulthood and independent living?
  • Pupils in the Post 16 phase have a tailored independence life skills programme including functional Maths and English, cookery, shopping, cleaning, access to community facilities and work experience.
  • Post 16 students are also given the opportunity to access college vocational  link courses if they wish to pursue a specific vocational route which the school does not have the expertise or resources to support.
  • Key Stage 4 and Post 16 students are able to access the school’s residential facilities to further develop their independence and living skills. This can be through accessing a one night per week residential placement for blocks of one term at a time and/or accessing our after school Independence Club, which operates on two evenings per week from 3.45pm to 6.30pm.
  • Key stage 4 and Post 16 students and their parents receive support in identifying future placements and the application process through working with designated staff in school and their Social Care Transitions Co-ordinator ( if appropriate)
  • In their final year students are also offered specific transition support into their next placement once identified, through planned visits, meetings between staff etc.
13. Where can I access further information?

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